RVA High School Course Descriptions  

Outlined below are the courses that we offer in the RVAHS.  In addition, we have some supplemental programs that may be used by students.  Please look over the course descriptions and choose the courses you would like to take this year.  We encourage students to take the RVAHS Online courses with live instruction.  However, students can also take courses independently from a variety of different curriculum vendors. 

Once you have chosen your classes, do your best to fill out the “RVAHS Course Sign Up Sheet” and submit it to the RVA Office, preferably through Skyward.  Once we receive your enrollment information and course selections we will give you a call and help you to finalize your schedule.  Please be sure to submit this information as soon as possible. 


RVA High School Online

Using online content (mainly provided by the Wisconsin eSchool Network – WeN) students will have “Blended Instruction.”  Students will have online classes that they can work through at their own pace, but they will also have teacher support daily in these courses.  Following a daily time schedule, students will log into their online classes and receive live instruction and help daily.  Attendance is mandatory for the first two weeks of almost every course.  Students can earn flexibility in their daily schedules by demonstrating mastery of the concepts and showing that they are able to maintain adequate pace.  There are some classes however, where there is limited “Earned Flexibility” and daily attendance is required. 

RVA High School Online English Courses

English I: 1.0 English Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 9

This year long course is an introduction to high school English.  Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, students explore the unknown, search for identity and equality, and seek achievement, opportunity, and understanding. They will read to analyze the way language is used to express human motivation and conduct research to examine the results of actions in the real world. *NCAA Approved

English II: 1.0 English Credit, Prerequisite English I, Required Grade 10

This year long course extends and expounds upon English concepts.  In this course, students see how the human experience, real life, is the foundation of the best stories, plays, poems, films, and articles. In each unit of the course, students explore a specific aspect of the human experience such as laughter, obstacles, betrayal, and fear. Through the study of literature, nonfiction, and life, students explore what it means to be human, fulfilled, triumphant, empowered, and transformed. *NCAA Approved

English III: 1.0 English Credit, Prerequisite English II, Required Grade 11

This year long course provides students the opportunity to be thorough, accurate, and compelling in their writing.  Students explore writing that is clear and concise and read stories that give perspective.  In English III, students gain an appreciation of American literature and the ways it reflects the times in which it was written. Students discover how people thought and lived and wrote about their experiences. *NCAA Approved

Career Prep: 0.5 English Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 11

This semester long course is designed to help students prepare themselves for life after high school. Students will discover possible career options, develop professional skills, and learn about themselves along the way.  Topics and assignments covered in class include: learning styles, resume writing, and interview etiquette.

Written Communications (Dual Credit): 0.5 High School English Credit, 3.0 Collegiate Credits; No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This semester long course develops writing skills which include pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing.  A variety of writing assignments is designed to help the learner analyze audience and purpose, research and organize ideas, and format and design documents based on subject matter and content. This course develops critical reading and thinking skills through the analysis of a variety of written documents.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.

Oral and Interpersonal Communications (Dual Credit): 0.5 High School English Credit, 3.0 Collegiate Credits; No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This semester long course is focused upon developing speaking, verbal and nonverbal communication, and listening skills through individual presentations, group activities, and other projects. This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.

Gothic Literature: 0.5 English Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to help students explore a unique genre of literature.  This course will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce a thrilling psychological environment for the reader. Terror versus horror, the influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented. By the time students have completed this course, they will have gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction. *NCAA Approved

Communications: 0.5 English Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to explore different types of communication.  From banner ads to billboards, newspaper articles, and Facebook feeds, people are constantly sharing ideas. This course looks at the many facets of mass media. Students will learn how the media shapes every aspect of our lives. We examine the role of newspapers, books, magazines, radio, movies, television, and the growing influence of Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.

Creative Writing: 0.5 English Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to teach students how to discover their creative thoughts and turn those ideas into realized pieces of creative writing.  For many hundreds of years, literature has been one of the most important human art forms. It allows us to give voice to our emotions, create imaginary worlds, express ideas, and escape the confines of material reality. Through creative writing, we can come to understand ourselves and our world a little bit better. This course provides students with a solid grounding in the writing process, from finding inspiration to building a basic story, to using complicated literary techniques and creating strange hybrid forms of poetic prose. *NCAA Approved

Popular Literature: 0.5 English Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to help students develop a fuller understanding of the human condition by exploring The Lord of the Rings films and comic books. Throughout the class, students will become familiar with Joseph Campbell's Monomyth theory and the Epic Hero Cycle.  Students will begin by studying book and film excerpts from JRR Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings series. They will learn about the Norse mythology that influenced Tolkien's work and the process of adapting books into movies.  The second half of the class is an introduction to the world of comic books. Students will start with a survey of the history of American comics and a review of major graphic novels circulating in the U.S. today.  This course concludes with students creating their own graphic novel.


 RVA High School Online Mathematics Courses

 

Pre-Algebra: 1.0 Math Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 9

This year long course is an introduction to high school math.  Pre-Algebra will help students transition from Elementary Math to Algebra.

Algebra I: 1.0 Math Credit, Prerequisite Pre-Algebra, Required Grades 9 - 10

This year long course is an introduction to high school math.  Algebra I is the foundation, the skills acquired in this course contain the basic knowledge needed for all future high school math courses. Each module in this course is presented in a step-by-step way right on the computer screen. Hands-on labs make the numbers, graphs, and equations more real. The content in this course is tied to real-world applications like sports, travel, business, and health. This course is designed to give students the skills and strategies to solve all kinds of mathematical problems. *NCAA Approved

Geometry: 1.0 Math Credit, Prerequisite Algebra, Required Grades 9 - 11

This year long course is designed to explore real world geometry.  Geometry is everywhere, not just in pyramids. Engineers use geometry to build highways and bridges. Artists use geometry to create perspective in their paintings, and mapmakers help travelers find things using the points located on a geometric grid. Throughout this course, students travel a mathematical highway illuminated by spatial relationships, reasoning, connections, and problem solving. *NCAA Approved

Algebra II: 1.0 Math Credit, Prerequisite Geometry, Recommended Grades 10 - 12

This year long course is designed to further extend a student’s knowledge of Algebra and prepare them for higher level math.  Starting with a review of basic algebra, you will learn polynomials, quadratic equations, exponential and logarithmic relations, and probability and statistics. *NCAA Approved

College Algebra (Dual Credit): 1.0 High School Math Credit, 3.0 Collegiate Credits; Prerequisites Algebra II, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This year long course covers those skills needed for success in Calculus and many application areas on a baccalaureate level. Topics include the real and complex number systems, polynomials, exponents, radicals, solving equations and inequalities (linear and nonlinear), relations and functions, systems of equations and inequalities (linear and nonlinear), matrices, graphing, conic sections, sequences and series, combinatorics, and the binomial theorem.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required. *NCAA Approved

Applied Math (Dual Credit): 1.0 High School Math Credit, 2.0 Collegiate Credits; Prerequisites Geometry, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This year long course covers review and application of basic arithmetic skills involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Introduction and application of percents, area, volume, ratios and proportions will also be covered. The measurement system, angle, perimeter, square and board feet and formulas for geometric shapes as well as algebra will also be included.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.


RVA High School Online Science Courses

Physical Science: 1.0 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 9

This year long course is an introduction to high school science.  This course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on basic physics and chemistry. Topics include forces and motion, energy through waves, electricity and magnetism, the matter around us, chemical bonding and reactions. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of the physical sciences. Students will demonstrate a vast understanding of the importance of the physical and chemical properties of the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives. *NCAA Approved

Biology: 1.0 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 10

This year long course guides students through the study of living and non-living systems and how they interact with one another. Students explore the world they live in by posing questions and seeking answers through scientific inquiry. Discovery takes place through observation and data collection. The students will be introduced to the structure, function, diversity, and evolution of living matter. This course encourages curiosity and provides opportunity for students to work on hands on lab activities.  Engaging in the study of biological science broadens the picture of the world around us. *NCAA Approved

Chemistry: 1.0 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This year long course is designed as an interactive, 21st century course focusing on Chemistry. Topics include the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter and their applications. This course is designed to serve as a foundation for the study of Chemistry. Students will demonstrate a vast understanding of the importance of Chemistry in the world around them; enabling them to apply these properties to their everyday lives. *NCAA Approved

Medical Terminology (Dual Credit): 0.5 High School Science Credit, 3.0 Collegiate Credits; No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This semester long course focuses on the component parts of medical terms: prefixes, suffixes and word roots. Students practice formation, analysis and reconstruction of terms. There is an emphasis on spelling, definition, and pronunciation.  Students will be introduced to operative, diagnostic, therapeutic and symptomatic terminology of all body systems, as well as systemic and surgical terminology.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.

Body, Structure, & Functions (Dual Credit): 1.0 High School Science Credit, 3.0 Collegiate Credits; No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This year long course focuses on the structures and functions of the human body. It also integrates and correlates applicable principles and concepts of cell biology and histology.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required. *NCAA Approved

Earth Space Science: 1.0 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 - 12

This year long course is a laboratory course focusing on the study of space, geologic structures and forces, the waters on our planet, and the atmospheric forces that shape our world. Through experimentation and investigation, students will explore the earth cycles including the geosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, atmosphere, and the carbon cycle. Students will learn about scientific inquiry, geologic time, space exploration, the solar system, and the universe. Upon completion of the course, students will have a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the world around them, becoming better caretakers of our planet, Earth. *NCAA Approved

Forensic Science I: 0.5 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to explore science in action!  Fingerprints. Blood spatter. DNA analysis. The world of law enforcement is increasingly making use of the techniques and knowledge from the sciences to better understand the crimes that are committed and to catch those individuals responsible for the crimes. Forensic science applies scientific knowledge to the criminal justice system. This course focuses on some of the techniques and practices used by forensic scientists during a crime scene investigation (CSI). Starting with how clues and data are recorded and preserved, the student will follow evidence trails until the CSI goes to trial, examining how various elements of the crime scene are analyzed and processed. *NCAA Approved

Forensic Science II: 0.5 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to further explore Forensic Science.  Although the crime scene represents the first step in solving crimes through forensic science, the crime laboratory plays a critical role in the analysis of evidence. This course focuses on the analysis of evidence and testing that takes place within this setting. We will examine some of the basic scientific principles and knowledge that guides forensic laboratory processes, such as those testing DNA, toxicology, and material analysis. Techniques such as microscopy, chromatography, odontology, entomology, mineralogy, and spectroscopy will be examined.

Introduction to Forestry & Natural Resources: 0.5 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to introduce students to a relevant science topic.  Forests and other natural resources play an important role in our world, from providing lumber and paper products to providing habitat for birds and animals. In the Forestry and Natural Resources course, you’ll learn more about forest ecology, management, and conservation. You’ll explore topics such as environmental policy, land use, water resources, and wildlife management. Finally, you’ll learn more about forestry related careers and important issues facing forestry professionals today.

Agri-Science I: 0.5 Science Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is designed to introduce students to the science of agriculture.  Agriculture has played an important role in the lives of humans for thousands of years. It has fed us and given us materials that have helped us survive. Today, scientists and practitioners are working to improve and better understand agriculture and how it can be used to continue to sustain human life. In this course, students learn about the development and maintenance of agriculture, animal systems, natural resources, and other food sources. Students also examine the relationship between agriculture and natural resources and the environment, health, politics, and world trade.


RVA High School Online Social Studies Courses

 

World History: 1.0 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 9

This year long course is an introduction to high school social studies.  Students will learn how the Roman Empire developed in two very distinct directions. Next, students will discover the great intellectual and cultural contributions of Islamic Empires. Journey through the Middle Ages of Europe and Japan to learn how knights and samurais lived. Students will also investigate the rise and fall of some of the great kingdoms of the Americas and Africa and then travel back to the Europe of the Renaissance and Reformation era. *NCAA Approved

U.S. History: 1.0 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 10

This year long course is a study of United States History.  The United States began as an experiment in freedom and democracy. Since its establishment, the country and its people have endured social, political and economic revolutions. In this course, students will investigate the people, events and ideas that have shaped the United States from the end of the Civil War through today.  Students are asked to analyze and evaluate decisions made by political, business and military leaders. Emphasis is placed on connections between events of the past and present. *NCAA Approved

U.S. Government: 0.5 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 11

This semester long course explores the United States Government.  Responsible citizenship, including civil and political participation is essential to maintain a representative government that truly represents the people of the United States. In this course, students learn about the structure of government and how it shares power at the local, state and federal levels. This course also explores founding principles that inspired the Constitution and Bill of Rights, preserving the freedoms that students experience daily. Students will examine the processes of each branch of government, the election process, and how citizens can impact public policy.  Students will examine the U.S. Court system, and become a part of the process by participating in the judicial decision making process. *NCAA Approved

Introduction to Sociology (Dual Credit): 1.0 High School Social Studies Credit, 3.0 Collegiate Credits; No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This year long course introduces students to the basic concepts of sociology: culture, socialization, social stratification, multi-culturalism, and the five institutions, including family, government, economics, religion, and education. Other topics include demography, deviance, technology, environment, social issues, social change, social organization, and workplace issues.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required. *NCAA Approved

Introduction to Psychology (Dual Credit): 1.0 High School Social Studies Credit, 3.0 Collegiate Credits; No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This year long course is a survey of the multiple aspects of human behavior. It involves a survey of the theoretical foundations of human functioning in such areas as learning, motivation, emotions, personality, deviance and pathology, physiological factors, and social influences. It directs the student to an insightful understanding of the complexities of human relationships in personal, social, and vocational settings.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required. *NCAA Approved

Cents & Sensibility (Dual Credit): 0.5 High School Social Studies Credit, 1.0 Collegiate Credit; No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 - 12

This semester long course is a practical study of consumer problems and consumer choice.  This course has an emphasis on developing the skill of consumer decision-making. Selected topics include: budgeting and family resource management, sources of consumer information, help in solving consumer problems and consumer decision-making in such areas as transportation, insurance, financial institutions, consumer goods and services, housing and credit.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.

Criminology I: 0.5 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course introduces students to the field of criminology, the study of crime. Student’s will look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological standpoints, explore the various types of crime and their consequences for society, and investigate how crime and criminals are handled by the criminal justice system. Why do some individuals commit crimes but others don't? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why do individuals receive different punishments for the same crime? What factors shape the criminal case process, from arrest to punishments? *NCAA Approved

Law & Order: Introduction to Legal Studies: 0.5 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course introduces students to the legal studies. Every society has laws that its citizens must follow. Laws help provide society with order and structure. Consumer laws help protect us from faulty goods; criminal laws help to protect society from individuals who harm others; and family laws handle the arrangements and issues that arise in areas like divorce and child custody. By understanding the workings of our court system, as well as how laws are actually carried out, we become more informed and responsible citizens in our communities and in our nation.

Anthropology I: 0.5 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 – 12

This semester long course studies Anthropology, the study of various aspects of humans within past and present societies. This course will explore the evolution, similarity and diversity of humankind through time. It will look at how we have evolved from a biologically and culturally weak species to one that has the ability to cause catastrophic change Exciting online video journeys to different areas of the world will also be presented in the course. *NCAA Approved

 Anthropology II: 0.5 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 11 – 12

This semester long course further expands on a students’ understanding of Anthropology.  Anthropology has helped us better understand cultures around the world and through different time period. This course continues the study of global cultures and the ways that humans have made sense of their world. We will examine some of the ways that cultures have understood and gave meaning to different stages of life and death. The course will also examine the creation of art within cultures and examine how cultures evolve and change over time. Finally, students will apply the concepts and insights learned from the study of anthropology to several cultures found in the world today. *NCAA Approved

History of the Holocaust: 0.5 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course explores the history of the Holocaust.  Holocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events to occur. In this course, students will study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multi-disciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students will gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference, the potential for government-supported terror, and they will get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.

Native American Cultural Studies: 0.5 Social Studies Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester long course is an introductory survey of Native American culture and history.  Topics explored include Wisconsin’s Indigenous Peoples, language, oral history, art, and more!  This course is for any student wishing to enrich their understanding and awareness of the Native American culture.


 RVA High School Online Physical Education and Health Courses

 

Fitness Fundamentals I: 0.5 Phy-Ed Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 9

This semester long course is designed to provide students with the basic skills and information needed to begin a personalized exercise program and maintain an active and healthy lifestyle. Students participate in pre- and post-fitness assessments in which they measure and analyze their own levels of fitness based on the five components of physical fitness: muscular strength, endurance, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and body composition. In this course, students research the benefits of physical activity, as well as the techniques, principles, and guidelines of exercise to keep them safe and healthy. Throughout this course students participate in a weekly fitness program involving elements of cardio, strength, and flexibility.

Fitness Fundamentals II: 0.5 Phy-Ed Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 10

This semester long course is designed to provide students with the basic skills and information needed to begin a personalized exercise program and maintain an active and healthy lifestyle. Students participate in pre- and post-fitness assessments in which they measure and analyze their own levels of fitness based on the five components of physical fitness: muscular strength, endurance, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and body composition. In this course, students research the benefits of physical activity, as well as the techniques, principles, and guidelines of exercise to keep them safe and healthy. Throughout this course students participate in a weekly fitness program involving elements of cardio, strength, and flexibility.

Comprehensive Physical Education: 0.5 Phy-Ed Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 11

This semester long course is designed to have students explore concepts involving personal fitness, team sports, dual sports, and individual and lifetime sports. Students will focus on health-related fitness as they set goals and develop a program to improve their fitness level through cardio, strength, and flexibility training. In addition, they will learn about biomechanics and movement concepts, as they enhance their level of skill-related fitness. Students will learn about game play concepts and specifically investigate the rules, guidelines, and skills pertaining to soccer, softball, volleyball, tennis, walking and running, dance, and yoga. Students take a pre- and post-fitness assessment. Throughout this course students also participate in a weekly fitness program involving elements of cardio, strength, and flexibility, as well as participating in a variety of dual, individual, and group sport activities.

Health and Personal Wellness: 0.5 Health Credit, No Prerequisites, Required Grade 9

This semester long course provides students with essential knowledge and decision-making skills for a healthy lifestyle. Students analyze aspects of emotional, social, and physical health and how these realms of health influence each other. Students apply principles of health and wellness to their own lives. In addition, they study behavior change and set health goals to work on throughout the semester.


RVA High School Online Elective Courses

Foundations of Leadership: 1.0 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 10

This year-long course is designed to have students explore the foundations of leadership and success while learning to develop the skills needed to transform their lives and the communities they live in.  Content areas include decision-making, goal setting, effective communication, organization, time management skills, attitude, preparation, perseverance, respect, honesty, integrity, courage, appreciation, composure, empathy, gratitude, tolerance, sacrifice, loyalty, responsibility, compassion, leadership, character, and more!  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.

Spanish I: 1.0 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This year-long course is designed to introduce students to the Spanish language as well as culture.  Throughout the course, students will develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. *NCAA Approved

Spanish II: 1.0 Elective Credit, Prerequisite Spanish I, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This year-long course is designed to further students’ Spanish language skills as well as culture.  Throughout the course, students will develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. *NCAA Approved

Spanish III: 1.0 Elective Credit, Prerequisite Spanish II, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This year-long course is designed to further students’ Spanish language skills as well as culture.  Throughout the course, students will develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

History of Rock & Roll I: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course is a guided tour through the background and history of popular music from the early-mid 20th Century through the mid 1970’s.  It will mainly focus on the rock and roll genre of music, but will also touch on other genres as they impact rock and roll.  Some major topics will include: Birth of Rock and Roll, Demise of Rock and Rise of Soul, British Invasion, Motown, Psychedelic, and the Rock Spectrum of the 1970’s.  This course is a fun survey of popular music through the generations.  The goal is for students to get an appreciation of past music and cultures, to discover music they haven’t been introduced to yet, and to open their minds to discover music in the world. 

History of Rock & Roll II: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course is a guided tour through the background and history of popular music starting with the mid 1970’s through the present day. The course will mainly focus on the rock and roll genre of music, but may also touch on other genres as they impact rock and roll.  Some major topics will include New Wave Punk, MTV generation, Rise of Heavy Metal & Rap, The Great Divide of the 1990’s and New Directions.  This course is a fun survey of popular music through the generations.  The goal is for students to get an appreciation of past music and cultures, to discover music they haven’t been introduced to yet, and to open their minds to discover more music in the world. 

Digital Photography I: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course introduces students to digital photography.  Have you ever wondered how photographers take such great pictures? Have you tried to take photographs and wondered why they didn't seem to capture that moment that you saw with your eyes? The Digital Photography I course focuses on the basics of photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students will be introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. Students will use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images, capturing people, landscapes, close-ups, and action photographs.

Digital Photography II: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course continues to explore digital photography.  In today's world, photographs are all around us, including in advertisements, on websites, and hung on our walls as art. Many of the images that we see have been created by professional photographers. In this course, students will examine various aspects of professional photography, including the ethics of the profession, and examine some of the areas that professional photographers may choose to specialize in, such as wedding photography and product photography. They will also learn more about some of the most respected professional photographers in history and we will learn how to critique photographs in order to better understand what creates an eye catching photograph.

Drawing I: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course introduces students to the basics of drawing using the elements and principles of art.

Drawing II: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course builds upon a student’s Drawing I skills by creating proportional and convincing imagery using advanced compositional skills.

Painting I: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course introduces students to the techniques of painting in various mediums and in various styles.

Painting II: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course builds upon a student’s painting techniques learned in Painting I.  Students learn how to create a polished painting at “finish” quality.

Design for Beginners: Create Your Own Business: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 10 – 12

In this semester-long course students will discover a passion, hobby or interest and then develop the design skills to create a business website for it with supporting marketing assets such as a logo, brand guide, photography, videography, and a social media marketing strategy and more!

Advertising & Sales Promotion: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course introduces students to advertising.  What comes to mind when you think of marketing? Perhaps a familiar television jingle plays in your head? Or maybe you think of those irritating sales phone calls? There is no denying the sheer magnitude and power of the marketing industry. Every year companies spend approximately $200 billion promoting their products and services and that is just in the United States alone! You may be familiar with being on the receiving end of marketing, but what is it like on the other side? In Advertising & Sales Promotions, you will see how these marketing campaigns, ads, and commercials are brought to life and you will meet some of the creative folks who produce them.

Sports & Entertainment Marketing: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Grades 9 – 12

This semester-long course introduces students to different fields of marketing.  Have you ever wished to play sports professionally? Have you dreamed of one day becoming an agent for a celebrity entertainer? If you answered yes to either question, then believe it or not, you've been fantasizing about entering the exciting world of sports and entertainment marketing. In this course, you'll have the opportunity to explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multi-billion dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. You'll learn about how professional athletes, sports teams, and well known entertainers are marketed as commodities and how some of them become billionaires as a result. If you've ever wondered about how things work behind the scenes of a major sporting event such as the Super Bowl or even entertained the idea of playing a role in such an event, then this course will introduce you to the fundamentals of such a career.

Resource: 1.0 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Required for Special Education Students in Grades 9 – 12

This year-long course is designed to help students in special education meet their IEP goals.  In Resource, students will be able to get additional support from a special education teacher.  During this daily time, students will work on organization, pacing, and assignments. This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.

Life Management Skills: 0.5 Elective Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended for Special Education and At-Risk Students in Grades 11 – 12

This semester-long course is designed to help students make good life choices.  Topics covered in this course include making healthy choices, family and friendships, decision-making, stress management, conflict resolution, communication, wellness, and being a smart consumer.  Sharing of community service ideas and experiences as well as academic and career planning will also be discussed.

Driver’s Education: No Credit, No Prerequisites, Recommended Age is 15 or Older

This semester-long course is designed to help students get their Driver’s License!  Driver’s Ed teaches teens who are looking at getting their driver’s license the facts, theories, and techniques of safe driving in a classroom setting.  This class will satisfy the “classroom” component required by the WI DMV.  Students wanting to get their license will need to complete the “behind the wheel” course locally.  This course has limited earned flexibility and daily attendance is required.


RVA High School Online

Other RVA Online elective courses can be taken independently by students, with a teacher overseeing them.

To see a listing of RVAHS Online offerings visit:

http://www.wisconsineschool.org/resources/digitalonline-content

Go to “Click Here to View Course Catalog”


Odysseyware

Odysseyware is an online curriculum.  Odysseyware includes courses in the core subjects of social studies and history, math, language arts, and science, as well as a variety of electives. Students complete these courses independently with an RVAHS teacher providing support for these classes. Core courses can be taken by students that need remediation in a subject or in special circumstances.  Odysseyware offers a large selection of elective courses which are open to all students.  

To see a listing of Odysseyware offerings visit:

https://www.odysseyware.com

Go to “Course Catalog”


American School

American School offers both book/paper-based and online curriculum choices.  Students can choose from courses in the core subject areas as well as elective courses.  American School is an independent, self-paced curriculum.  Students choosing this option will complete the courses independently with very limited support from RVAHS teachers.  Students will submit their unit tests and final exams to American School.  American School will do the grading of the tests and submit a transcript to the RVA at the end of the semester.  American School will only be an option to students who have first demonstrated that they can successfully meet the requirements of the RVAHS.

To see a listing of American School offerings visit:

https://www.americanschoolofcorr.com

Go to “Course Descriptions”


Consortium Districts

If you are enrolled through a consortium district, you may choose to take courses in your resident district.  To enroll into courses within the building of your consortium resident district, please meet with their building principal or guidance department to enroll in a class.  Daily attendance in the building is required.  Please note which classes you have enrolled in within the building on your Course Sign Up sheet along with the times.  We will fit them into your RVA schedule. 

To see a listing of your consortium course offerings visit:

Your resident district’s building principal or school counselor